Crochet Pattern Review: Notes and Tips on Making the Father Pullover Sweater

Notes and Tips on Making the Father Pullover Sweater - link to free crochet pattern in post

I finally completed my first wearable that is not a hat or scarf. I felt adventurous and ready to tackle a pattern for a crocheted mens sweater. Originally I had planned to make the Tip Top Sweater from Interweaveicon (affiliate purchase link) for dear hubby, but when the time came to put this project on my hook I didn’t have the funds for that much DK yarn. I had a ton of Brava Worsted so I looked around for a worsted weight sweater and found the Father Pullover by Red Heart (aka the Simple Sweater for Him on All Free Crochet).

This project schooled me a bit so I’m sharing my notes and thoughts with takeaway ideas in bold.

This pattern uses all hdc (half double crochet) in vertical rows. The effect is to give the rows a striped look. I’m not loving this and think I would avoid all hdc. I may alter it to use the griddle stitch if I make this again. The striped effect also made it harder to sew up, as the rows on the back and front of the sweater needed to be lined up exactly.

Father Pullover Sleeves - Notes and Tips on Making the Father Pullover Sweater - link to free crochet pattern in post

I used KP Brava worsted in Umber, which is a really pretty dark brown. I bought tons of it for a cabled blanket only to realize that dark colored yarn is not the best yarn to do cables in. I couldn’t see what I was doing. It was the same way sewing up the pieces of this sweater and I would probably not chose a dark yarn for another sweater until I felt more experienced.

For a sweater, medium-weight yarn is heavy! I made it in men’s XL, but feel that the worsted weight yarn added to the effect that this sweater looks a bit big. I would go with a pattern calling for a DK yarn next time.

Trouble with the sleeves

The Father Pullover pattern itself can be confusing and I needed to head to the net for help a few times. Everyone and their mother has problems with the way the sleeves are written, and I saw a few people who had resorted to writing their own sleeve pattern. It’s really easy to miss that the pattern says to increase on both ends of the sleeves. So you are adding 2 stitches per row – one stitch to either end, not increase only 1 as it seems to say as it’s easy to miss the word BOTH.

Father Pullove Seams - Notes and Tips on Making the Father Pullover Sweater - link to free crochet pattern in post

The pattern also calls for counting the turning chain of each row as the first hdc and skipping the first stitch. Skipping the first stitch made huge holes at the beginning of each row and it looks horrible. I’m not skipping next time, instead I will use the Foundation Turning Stitch I recently discovered.

I experimented with leaving long tails on the yarn to use them to sew up the pieces. This worked ok but was a little messy when there were lots of them and I didn’t know which ones I’d be using.

Overall, I’m pleased with the results for a first project. It’s very warm and I’m happy to see dh in it, even the striped look is growing on me. I would just consider the things I learned here for a next time.

Did you make this sweater? I’m not an expert, so I’d love feedback on my tips and thoughts. Let me know in the comments section below.


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What do you think?

22 Responses

  1. Geri says:

    Brilliant idea for filling in the ugly holes!! Why didn’t I think of that?? =D

  2. Vicki says:

    When ever I am working a flat piece such as this, I always make a hdc2tog in the very first stitch and the stitch you would use as your first working stitch. That way you’re not increasing your stitch count, but you are filling in that ugly hole so it isn’t there. This works also for DC or TRC as well.
    Thank you for your notes. I am making this for my hubby. I have made baby sweaters before where the increase is on both sides of the sleeve, and it is very easy to miss that point in the instructions. You have made me Aware so I’ve circled that part on my sheet so I don’t do that like I have with baby sweaters. Your sweater looks great. I usually don’t like the striping effect hdc gives to sweaters, buy for some reason I really like it on this particular sweater.

    • Sakeenah says:

      Thanks, Vicki! Excellent tip! I will definitely remember the hdc2tog for the next garment. I’m happy you found my notes useful. Stop by with a pic of your finished project 🙂

  3. Megan B. says:

    This is the first sweater I’ve ever attempted to make, and I’m having trouble getting out of the starting gate. Is this pattern crocheted in the round or in rows that make pieces that you eventually sew together?

  4. Anna says:

    Thank you Thank you! I am currently working on this pattern and it is my first sweater. I have redone a sleeve 3 times and couldn’t figure out why it looked so weird. I will do it right now! Thank you!

  5. Katy says:

    Thank you soooo much for the idea of using the Girdle stitch instead of the hdc rows!! I loved the style of this sweater, but hated the stripes!

  6. geri says:

    Hi everyone
    Okay I’m stuck on the Right Shoulder Shaping…the pattern says attach yarn in the 15th stitch TO THE LEFT OF THE RIGHT SHOULDER SHAPING. Huh?? If that’s correct and I’m beginning on the right side (not wrong side) that would mean I’m starting the 1st row in mid-air. I’ve played around with it and I’m only succeeding in tearing my stitches and my hair out. Help =0

  7. geri says:

    Wonky?? Haven’t heard that in a coon’s age =D
    I checked out 3 differnet tutorials on the web for turning chain alternatives and the easiest by far is on crocheteverafter.com “How to Eliminate the Gaps from Turning Chains Tutorial”. Of course that’s purely a personal preference but I’m using it on the pullover now and the technique looks much better than the 2-chain turn.
    I checked out the sleeve increases at each end and I’m glad you pointed them out; I may have missed that. Here we go!

  8. geri says:

    I’m working on the back so I just started this sweater and I noticed the gaping holes too. I hope my brother-in-law can overlook them. I’ll use your tip on the foundation turning stitch for the rest. My big fear is setting in the sleeves. I’ve looked on the net but nothing seemed very clear. I wish someone had a video tutorial on indenting sleeves! I’ve never made a man’s sweater before…I think you did a fabulous job UmmiZu with your first attempt.

    • Sakeenah says:

      Thank you, I’m so glad you found my tips useful! I think as long as you line everything up right, you should be fine. You can always take it out if it seems a little wonky.

  9. cindy ortega says:

    I’m planning to make this sweater for my hubby, thanks for the tips!

  10. Mari says:

    I’m so glad I found your post. Thank you for postig pictures of the sweater and joining pieces. I am attempting this as my first big crochet project, an adult can wear. I fund it hard to find a pullover pattern for a guy sweater in crochet. When I found this I went and bought the yarn and also picked a brown color from what I saw at the store it was what I liked best. My first choice in color was on short supply at the store. I liked reading your tips and will apply them, especially about the gaping. I noticed that when I made the swatch. If I get stuck, I may need to come back and ask you!

    • UmmiZu says:

      Hi, Mari! I’m so glad you found this useful. Smart to make a swatch. I wish I had done that. Please do come back if you need help. I will try my very best to help you.

  11. You did a good job with it. I would like to learn to crochet a pretty sweater for one of my girls.

  12. Ana BC says:

    Well done, and congratulations 🙂

  13. UmmAyana says:

    This is great! I think it’s awesome that you were able to stick with it and finish even after finding some things you didn’t really like about the pattern. I think it came out looking awesome!

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